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The Culture of Control: Crime and Social Order in Contemporary Society

At the second meeting, students will be expected to have read the material and be prepared to discuss it. This course is an introduction to the central themes of the sociology of law. It aims to introduce students to key questions such as "how does law relate to society? The course is organized around a main them - "law and modernity" - which will serve to introduce the main sociological theories of law and legal change, and also some of the contemporary debates that ask whether modernity is being displaced by a form of legal and societal "postmodernity".

The Culture of Control @crime and Social Order in Contemporary Society' - sehylydafoji.cf

The course does not presuppose prior knowledge of sociology or social theory, and students will be invited to draw upon their knowledge of particular areas of law to develop and apply the theoretical ideas discussed in the course. This seminar explores the nature of criminal punishment in America today.

We will explore the whole range of criminal sanctions and penal institutions; discuss the aims of sentencing and how these relate to actual penal practices and outcomes; view the system in historical and comparative perspective; examine sociological and historical accounts that aim to explain its distinctive features; consider how various features of the American state and American society influence the pattern of punishment; and examine current strategies of legal and political reform.

Throughout the class we will be trying to explain the relation of penal policy to American society, asking why American penality changed so dramatically over the last 40 years and why it differs so markedly from punishment in comparable nations.


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Readings will largely consist of criminological, sociological and historical materials, but no prior knowledge of these subjects will be presumed. The aim of this seminar is to develop an in-depth analysis of the institution of capital punishment and to address a series of questions to which it gives rise. Using historical and sociological research, the seminar will explore how the forms, functions and social meanings of capital punishment have changed over time, and what social forces have driven these changes.

Thereafter, the class will focus upon the modern American death penalty, and the specific characteristics of the institution that has taken shape in the post-Furman era. Collective Living: In his new book, David Garland asserts the necessity of the welfare state. South, New York, NY Faculty David W. Faculty and Topics Entire Site.

The Culture Of Control: Crime And Social Order In Contemporary Society

Enviado por Gabriel Brezinski flag Denunciar. This increased susceptibility is by no means an inevitable, inexorable feature of late modern life. Some societies, most notably Japan and Switzerland, maintained a high and effective level of largely informal crime control, while most others eventually found merhods of stemming the rising tide of crime. But the initial impact of late modernity was to make high rates of crime much more probable as a direct eoIt' sequence of the new social and economic arrangements that it put in place.

Social space became more stretched out, more anonymous and less well fou.

The Problem of Social Order

The ';old categories of 'crime' and 'delinquency' became less obvious in their behav- ttlouralreference and less absolute in their moral force.